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    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=app_2373072738&gid=70376
020308#!/group.php?gid=70376020308&v=wall Cherokee Heritage Facebook group is installing New Administrators, Council for the website, and youth council for the website. Other positions may be added as a need is realized. If you feel you may have something to contribute as a Council, youth Council member, or an Administrator, or even as a member, please log into the group and let us know how you would like to help. It is time to get back to the business of helping our brothers and sisters find their Ancestors, Culture and help keep things going for the next generation and beyond.
We have never needed government, federal or tribal, permission to help each other and our Children.
Rolling Thunder



This something that will be applied to us as much as possible in the future.
RT

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of
Indigenous Peoples



Adopted by General Assembly Resolution 61/295 on 13 September 2007     

The General Assembly,
Guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, and good faith in the fulfilment of the obligations assumed by States in accordance with the Charter,

Affirming that indigenous peoples are equal to all other peoples, while recognizing the right of all peoples to be different, to consider themselves different, and to be respected as such,

Affirming also that all peoples contribute to the diversity and richness of civilizations and cultures, which constitute the common heritage of humankind,

Affirming further that all doctrines, policies and practices based on or advocating superiority of peoples or individuals on the basis of national origin or racial, religious, ethnic or cultural differences are racist, scientifically false, legally invalid, morally condemnable and socially unjust,

Reaffirming that indigenous peoples, in the exercise of their rights, should be free from discrimination of any kind,

Concerned that indigenous peoples have suffered from historic injustices as a result of, inter alia, their colonization and dispossession of their lands, territories and resources, thus preventing them from exercising, in particular, their right to development in accordance with their own needs and interests,

Recognizing the urgent need to respect and promote the inherent rights of indigenous peoples which derive from their political, economic and social structures and from their cultures, spiritual traditions, histories and philosophies, especially their rights to their lands, territories and resources,

Recognizing also the urgent need to respect and promote the rights of indigenous peoples affirmed in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements with States,

Welcoming the fact that indigenous peoples are organizing themselves for political, economic, social and cultural enhancement and in order to bring to an end all forms of discrimination and oppression wherever they occur,

Convinced that control by indigenous peoples over developments affecting them and their lands, territories and resources will enable them to maintain and strengthen their institutions, cultures and traditions, and to promote their development in accordance with their aspirations and needs,

Recognizing that respect for indigenous knowledge, cultures and traditional practices contributes to sustainable and equitable development and proper management of the environment,

Emphasizing the contribution of the demilitarization of the lands and territories of indigenous peoples to peace, economic and social progress and development, understanding and friendly relations among nations and peoples of the world,

Recognizing in particular the right of indigenous families and communities to retain shared responsibility for the upbringing, training, education and well-being of their children, consistent with the rights of the child,

Considering that the rights affirmed in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements between States and indigenous peoples are, in some situations, matters of international concern, interest, responsibility and character,

Considering also that treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements, and the relationship they represent, are the basis for a strengthened partnership between indigenous peoples and States,

Acknowledging that the Charter of the United Nations, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (2) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights,2 as well as the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action,(3) affirm the fundamental importance of the right to self-determination of all peoples, by virtue of which they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development,

Bearing in mind that nothing in this Declaration may be used to deny any peoples their right to self-determination, exercised in conformity with international law,

Convinced that the recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples in this Declaration will enhance harmonious and cooperative relations between the State and indigenous peoples, based on principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, non-discrimination and good faith,

Encouraging States to comply with and effectively implement all their obligations as they apply to indigenous peoples under international instruments, in particular those related to human rights, in consultation and cooperation with the peoples concerned,

Emphasizing that the United Nations has an important and continuing role to play in promoting and protecting the rights of indigenous peoples,

Believing that this Declaration is a further important step forward for the recognition, promotion and protection of the rights and freedoms of indigenous peoples and in the development of relevant activities of the United Nations system in this field,

Recognizing and reaffirming that indigenous individuals are entitled without discrimination to all human rights recognized in international law, and that indigenous peoples possess collective rights which are indispensable for their existence, well-being and integral development as peoples,

Recognizing that the situation of indigenous peoples varies from region to region and from country to country and that the significance of national and regional particularities and various historical and cultural backgrounds should be taken into consideration,

Solemnly proclaims the following United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a standard of achievement to be pursued in a spirit of partnership and mutual respect:

Article 1
Indigenous peoples have the right to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights(4) and international human rights law.

Article 2
Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin or identity.

Article 3
Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.

Article 4
Indigenous peoples, in exercising their right to self-determination, have the right to autonomy or self-government in matters relating to their internal and local affairs, as well as ways and means for financing their autonomous functions.

Article 5
Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions, while retaining their right to participate fully, if they so choose, in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the State.

Article 6
Every indigenous individual has the right to a nationality.

Article 7
1. Indigenous individuals have the rights to life, physical and mental integrity, liberty and security of person.
2. Indigenous peoples have the collective right to live in freedom, peace and security as distinct peoples and shall not be subjected to any act of genocide or any other act of violence, including forcibly removing children of the group to another group.

Article 8
1. Indigenous peoples and individuals have the right not to be subjected to forced assimilation or destruction of their culture.
2. States shall provide effective mechanisms for prevention of, and redress for:
(a) Any action which has the aim or effect of depriving them of their integrity as distinct peoples, or of their cultural values or ethnic identities;
(b) Any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing them of their lands, territories or resources;
(c) Any form of forced population transfer which has the aim or effect of violating or undermining any of their rights;
(d) Any form of forced assimilation or integration;
(e) Any form of propaganda designed to promote or incite racial or ethnic discrimination directed against them.

Article 9
Indigenous peoples and individuals have the right to belong to an indigenous community or nation, in accordance with the traditions and customs of the community or nation concerned. No discrimination of any kind may arise from the exercise of such a right.

Article 10
Indigenous peoples shall not be forcibly removed from their lands or territories. No relocation shall take place without the free, prior and informed consent of the indigenous peoples concerned and after agreement on just and fair compensation and, where possible, with the option of return.

Article 11
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to practise and revitalize their cultural traditions and customs. This includes the right to maintain, protect and develop the past, present and future manifestations of their cultures, such as archaeological and historical sites, artefacts, designs, ceremonies, technologies and visual and performing arts and literature.
2. States shall provide redress through effective mechanisms, which may include restitution, developed in conjunction with indigenous peoples, with respect to their cultural, intellectual, religious and spiritual property taken without their free, prior and informed consent or in violation of their laws, traditions and customs.

Article 12
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to manifest, practise, develop and teach their spiritual and religious traditions, customs and ceremonies; the right to maintain, protect, and have access in privacy to their religious and cultural sites; the right to the use and control of their ceremonial objects; and the right to the repatriation of their human remains.
2. States shall seek to enable the access and/or repatriation of ceremonial objects and human remains in their possession through fair, transparent and effective mechanisms developed in conjunction with indigenous peoples concerned.

Article 13
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literatures, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons.
2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected and also to ensure that indigenous peoples can understand and be understood in political, legal and administrative proceedings, where necessary through the provision of interpretation or by other appropriate means.

Article 14
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.
2. Indigenous individuals, particularly children, have the right to all levels and forms of education of the State without discrimination.
3. States shall, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, take effective measures, in order for indigenous individuals, particularly children, including those living outside their communities, to have access, when possible, to an education in their own culture and provided in their own language.

Article 15
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the dignity and diversity of their cultures, traditions, histories and aspirations which shall be appropriately reflected in education and public information.
2. States shall take effective measures, in consultation and cooperation with the indigenous peoples concerned, to combat prejudice and eliminate discrimination and to promote tolerance, understanding and good relations among indigenous peoples and all other segments of society.

Article 16
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish their own media in their own languages and to have access to all forms of non-indigenous media without discrimination.
2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that State-owned media duly reflect indigenous cultural diversity. States, without prejudice to ensuring full freedom of expression, should encourage privately owned media to adequately reflect indigenous cultural diversity.

Article 17
1. Indigenous individuals and peoples have the right to enjoy fully all rights established under applicable international and domestic labour law.
2. States shall in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples take specific measures to protect indigenous children from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child’s education, or to be harmful to the child’s health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development, taking into account their special vulnerability and the importance of education for their empowerment.
3. Indigenous individuals have the right not to be subjected to any discriminatory conditions of labour and, inter alia, employment or salary.

Article 18
Indigenous peoples have the right to participate in decision-making in matters which would affect their rights, through representatives chosen by themselves in accordance with their own procedures, as well as to maintain and develop their own indigenous decision-making institutions.

Article 19
States shall consult and cooperate in good faith with the indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free, prior and informed consent before adopting and implementing legislative or administrative measures that may affect them.

Article 20
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and develop their political, economic and social systems or institutions, to be secure in the enjoyment of their own means of subsistence and development, and to engage freely in all their traditional and other economic activities.
2. Indigenous peoples deprived of their means of subsistence and development are entitled to just and fair redress.

Article 21
1. Indigenous peoples have the right, without discrimination, to the improvement of their economic and social conditions, including, inter alia, in the areas of education, employment, vocational training and retraining, housing, sanitation, health and social security.
2. States shall take effective measures and, where appropriate, special measures to ensure continuing improvement of their economic and social conditions. Particular attention shall be paid to the rights and special needs of indigenous elders, women, youth, children and persons with disabilities.

Article 22
1. Particular attention shall be paid to the rights and special needs of indigenous elders, women, youth, children and persons with disabilities in the implementation of this Declaration.
2. States shall take measures, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, to ensure that indigenous women and children enjoy the full protection and guarantees against all forms of violence and discrimination.

Article 23
Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for exercising their right to development. In particular, indigenous peoples have the right to be actively involved in developing and determining health, housing and other economic and social programmes affecting them and, as far as possible, to administer such programmes through their own institutions.

Article 24
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to their traditional medicines and to maintain their health practices, including the conservation of their vital medicinal plants, animals and minerals. Indigenous individuals also have the right to access, without any discrimination, to all social and health services.
2. Indigenous individuals have an equal right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. States shall take the necessary steps with a view to achieving progressively the full realization of this right.

Article 25
Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinctive spiritual relationship with their traditionally owned or otherwise occupied and used lands, territories, waters and coastal seas and other resources and to uphold their responsibilities to future generations in this regard.

Article 26
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned, occupied or otherwise used or acquired.
2. Indigenous peoples have the right to own, use, develop and control the lands, territories and resources that they possess by reason of traditional ownership or other traditional occupation or use, as well as those which they have otherwise acquired.
3. States shall give legal recognition and protection to these lands, territories and resources. Such recognition shall be conducted with due respect to the customs, traditions and land tenure systems of the indigenous peoples concerned.

Article 27
States shall establish and implement, in conjunction with indigenous peoples concerned, a fair, independent, impartial, open and transparent process, giving due recognition to indigenous peoples’ laws, traditions, customs and land tenure systems, to recognize and adjudicate the rights of indigenous peoples pertaining to their lands, territories and resources, including those which were traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used. Indigenous peoples shall have the right to participate in this process.

Article 28
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to redress, by means that can include restitution or, when this is not possible, just, fair and equitable compensation, for the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used, and which have been confiscated, taken, occupied, used or damaged without their free, prior and informed consent.
2. Unless otherwise freely agreed upon by the peoples concerned, compensation shall take the form of lands, territories and resources equal in quality, size and legal status or of monetary compensation or other appropriate redress.

Article 29
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the conservation and protection of the environment and the productive capacity of their lands or territories and resources. States shall establish and implement assistance programmes for indigenous peoples for such conservation and protection, without discrimination.
2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that no storage or disposal of hazardous materials shall take place in the lands or territories of indigenous peoples without their free, prior and informed consent.
3. States shall also take effective measures to ensure, as needed, that programmes for monitoring, maintaining and restoring the health of indigenous peoples, as developed and implemented by the peoples affected by such materials, are duly implemented.

Article 30
1. Military activities shall not take place in the lands or territories of indigenous peoples, unless justified by a relevant public interest or otherwise freely agreed with or requested by the indigenous peoples concerned.
2. States shall undertake effective consultations with the indigenous peoples concerned, through appropriate procedures and in particular through their representative institutions, prior to using their lands or territories for military activities.

Article 31
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of their sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora, oral traditions, literatures, designs, sports and traditional games and visual and performing arts. They also have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions.
2. In conjunction with indigenous peoples, States shall take effective measures to recognize and protect the exercise of these rights.

Article 32
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for the development or use of their lands or territories and other resources.
2. States shall consult and cooperate in good faith with the indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free and informed consent prior to the approval of any project affecting their lands or territories and other resources, particularly in connection with the development, utilization or exploitation of mineral, water or other resources.
3. States shall provide effective mechanisms for just and fair redress for any such activities, and appropriate measures shall be taken to mitigate adverse environmental, economic, social, cultural or spiritual impact.

Article 33
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine their own identity or membership in accordance with their customs and traditions. This does not impair the right of indigenous individuals to obtain citizenship of the States in which they live.
2. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine the structures and to select the membership of their institutions in accordance with their own procedures.

Article 34
Indigenous peoples have the right to promote, develop and maintain their institutional structures and their distinctive customs, spirituality, traditions, procedures, practices and, in the cases where they exist, juridical systems or customs, in accordance with international human rights standards.

Article 35
Indigenous peoples have the right to determine the responsibilities of individuals to their communities.

Article 36
1. Indigenous peoples, in particular those divided by international borders, have the right to maintain and develop contacts, relations and cooperation, including activities for spiritual, cultural, political, economic and social purposes, with their own members as well as other peoples across borders.
2. States, in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, shall take effective measures to facilitate the exercise and ensure the implementation of this right.

Article 37
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the recognition, observance and enforcement of treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements concluded with States or their successors and to have States honour and respect such treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
2. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as diminishing or eliminating the rights of indigenous peoples contained in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.

Article 38
States in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, shall take the appropriate measures, including legislative measures, to achieve the ends of this Declaration.

Article 39
Indigenous peoples have the right to have access to financial and technical assistance from States and through international cooperation, for the enjoyment of the rights contained in this Declaration.

Article 40
Indigenous peoples have the right to access to and prompt decision through just and fair procedures for the resolution of conflicts and disputes with States or other parties, as well as to effective remedies for all infringements of their individual and collective rights. Such a decision shall give due consideration to the customs, traditions, rules and legal systems of the indigenous peoples concerned and international human rights.

Article 41
The organs and specialized agencies of the United Nations system and other intergovernmental organizations shall contribute to the full realization of the provisions of this Declaration through the mobilization, inter alia, of financial cooperation and technical assistance. Ways and means of ensuring participation of indigenous peoples on issues affecting them shall be established.

Article 42
The United Nations, its bodies, including the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, and specialized agencies, including at the country level, and States shall promote respect for and full application of the provisions of this Declaration and follow up the effectiveness of this Declaration.

Article 43
The rights recognized herein constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.

Article 44
All the rights and freedoms recognized herein are equally guaranteed to male and female indigenous individuals.

Article 45
Nothing in this Declaration may be construed as diminishing or extinguishing the rights indigenous peoples have now or may acquire in the future.

Article 46
1. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, people, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act contrary to the Charter of the United Nations or construed as authorizing or encouraging any action which would dismember or impair, totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States.
2. In the exercise of the rights enunciated in the present Declaration, human rights and fundamental freedoms of all shall be respected. The exercise of the rights set forth in this Declaration shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law and in accordance with international human rights obligations. Any such limitations shall be non-discriminatory and strictly necessary solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and for meeting the just and most compelling requirements of a democratic society.
3. The provisions set forth in this Declaration shall be interpreted in accordance with the principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, equality, non-discrimination, good governance and good faith.

(2) See resolution 2200 A (XXI), annex.

(3) A/CONF.157/24 (Part I), chap. III.

(4) Resolution 217 A (III).

http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/cherokeeheritageNA/index.html
Cherokee Civil War Has Been Declared

JOINT COUNCIL
OF
THE CHEROKEE NATION
AND
THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS
Resolution 1# 00-08
A RESOLUTION OPPOSING FABRICATED CHEROKEE "TRIBES" AND "INDIAN'S"   
   This is fairly self-explanatory. This resolution specifies "Tribes" and "Indians". This leaves no doubt that they fully intend to come after individuals. I personally feel they mean to include all mix blood and as well as those previously referred to as Freedman Descendants.

\\'HEREAS, the Cherokee Nation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians since time
immemorial have exercised the sovereign rights of self-government on behalf of the Cherokee
people; and
   The biggest issue I have here is the "time immemorial" clause. It is well established that in the past it was much closer to a confederation and each town was free to opt out of any decision made by the Joint Council representing the towns.

\VHEREAS, the Cherokee Nation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians are federally
recognized Indian Nations with a historic and continual government to government relationship
with the United States of America; and
   Again time line problem. Have not always been U.S. This document is full of subtle deceptions, my opinion.
\VHEREAS, the Joint Council unites the Legislative Branches of government of the Cherokee
Nation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, representing approximately 294,000 Cherokee
people throughout the United States of America; and
   The word "unites" implies more than it actually does. Unless one is going to surrender political Sovereignty to the other. Subtle deception.

WHEREAS, the two Cherokee Tribal governments share a common history prior to forced
removal in 1838, and then separate histories to the present, yet our common language, culture,
and traditions have made the Cherokee Nation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians distinct
and unique Native people from other Indian Tribes and other people, as was declared by the Joint
Council in Resolution No. 3-92, adopted on August 11, 1992 in Cherokee, North Carolina; and
   No comment here as I have not read the resolution referenced.
\VHEREAS, the Cherokee Nation has been aware of a growing number of non-Indian groups
claiming to be Cherokee tribes or bands and that these groups have been organizing and
attempting to gain federal recognition, this problem being acknowledged by the Joint Council in
Resolution No. 008, adopted on October 3, 1988 in Cherokee, North Carolina; and
  Here I have several issues. Non-Indian groups claiming to be Cherokee tribes or bands, is totally based on the categories of recognition of the BIA. This is another subtle deception and selective use of and manipulation of the law. Most of these, if not all of the groups, and yes there are some dishonorable people in some of the just as their is good people in every one of them, do fall under the BIA's use of the "Indian". http://www.doi.gov/cheeroke.html I will let the following speak for itself and revise and extend my remarks at another time if need be.
Today, individuals of Cherokee ancestry fall into the following categories:
(1) Living persons who were listed on the final rolls of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma (Dawes Commission Rolls) that were approved and descendants of these persons. These final rolls were closed in 1907.
(2) Individuals enrolled as members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina and their descendants who are eligible for enrollment with the Band.
(3) Persons on the list of members identified by a resolution dated April 19, 1949, and certified by the Superintendent of the Five Civilized Tribes Agency and their descendants who are eligible for enrollment with the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indian of Oklahoma.
(4) All other persons of Cherokee Indian ancestry.
Category 4.
Information about Indian ancestry of individuals in this category of Cherokees is more difficult to locate. This is primarily because the federal government has never maintained a list of all the persons of Cherokee Indian descent, indicating their tribal affiliation, degree of Indian blood or other data. In order to establish Cherokee ancestry you should use the same methods prescribed in "Indian Ancestry" and "Genealogical Research" material. (Reference directories " INDIAN ANCESTRY" and " GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH")
WHEREAS, the Department of the Interior through the Bureau of Indian Affairs' Branch of
Acknowledgment and Research maintains the responsibility for addressing specific applications
for federal recognition and The Cherokee Nation and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians fully
support the federal recognition process; and

WHEREAS, the history of the Cherokee Nation and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is well
documented and no other tribes or bands of Cherokee Indians exist aside from those already
federally recognized, which includes the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in
Oklahoma; and

   Another subtle deception to say that no other bands of Cherokee Indians exist. Please refer to the BIA link. INK "http://www.doi.gov/cheeroke.html" http://www.doi.gov/cheeroke.html


WHEREAS, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Cherokee Nation in Joint Council
assembled in Resolution No. 4-96, adopted on October 4, 1996 have previously expressed
opposition to the "state recognition" process by the State of Georgia or other states in the United
States who may seek to recognize a group of 'Cherokee' that do not already have federal
recognition;

   Here I am going to express my opinion. No Dependent Indian Nation, has the right to interfere with the rights of the states.


WHEREAS, public funding by pseudo-Cherokee Tribes is of epidemic proportions and often
involves membership fees; misleading presentations to school children and interference in a
multitude of functions including child welfare cases; and

   Subtle deception by continuous references such as "pseudo-Cherokee Tribes". Pseudo means that all that are affiliated, even with State Recognized Tribes are fake, pretend, artificial, imitation, etc,etc. State a lie long enough and you can get enough people to believe it.


WHEREAS, the sovereignty and reputation of the Cherokee Nation and the Eastern Band of
Cherokee Indians, as well as members the general public continue to be in jeopardy due to the
acts of individuals who organize and administer fabricated Cherokee tribes; and


   Cherokee Nation has done most of its own damage to its reputation. Delaware's separation to an Independent Nation adds a case in point as well to the Freedman fiasco.


WHEREAS, untold millions of federal dollars that are appropriated for the benefit of tribal
people are being diverted from their intended purpose, including money distributed by federal
agencies such as the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Native
Americans, the Department of Labor, Department of Education, Department of Agriculture and
other federal agencies.


   I have no research in this area to speak of. It would appear that each group must meet the criteria of each department handing out the grant. It is not only Indian Tribes that get federal grants. Other groups may apply as well for different types of grants.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Joint Council of the Cherokee
Nation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians do hereby support the federal recognition
process of Department of Interior as administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs Branch
of Acknowledgment and Research, and endorse the criteria used by the Bureau of Indian Affairs
as appropriate; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Cherokee Nation and Eastern Band of
Cherokee Indians denounce the state or federal recognition of any further 'Cherokee' tribes or
bands, aside from the those already federally recognized, and commit to exposing and assisting
state and federal authorities in eradicating any group which attempts or claims to operate as a
government of Cherokee people; and

   Again there is that issue of States Rights. If I am to be eradicated by any State or Federal authority, I reserve the right to exercise the Declaration of Independence in my own and others behalf.
IN CONGRESS, JULY 4, 1776
The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America
When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation............And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that no public funding from any federal or state
government should be expended on behalf of non-federally recognized 'Cherokee' tribes or bands or the individual members thereof; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Cherokee Nation and Eastern Band of
Cherokee Indians shall call for a full accounting of all federal monies given to state recognized, unrecognized or 5O1(c)(3) charitable organizations that claim any Cherokee affiliation.

   It might actually surprise everyone that I have very little problem with this. There should always be accountability. To whom much is given much is required.


BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the federal and state governments should
stringently apply a federal definition of "Indian" that includes only citizens of federally
recognized Indian tribes, to prevent non-Indians from selling membership in 'Cherokee' tribes for the purpose ofexploiting the Indian Arts and Crafts Act.
   

There is that pesky category 4 thing again. html" http://www.doi.gov/cheeroke.html


BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that no 501(c)(3) organization, state recognized or
unrecognized groups shall be acknowledged as Cherokee,
   

  States Rights issues again. Here is the link to the BIA regulations on acknowledgement.
  http://www.doi.gov/ocl/2005/FedAcknowledgement.htm


BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that any individual who is not a member of a federally recognized Cherokee tribe, in academia or otherwise, is hereby discouraged from claiming to speak as a Cherokee, or on behalf of Cherokee citizens, or using claims of Cherokee heritage to advance his or her career or credentials.

   Refer to Category 4  http://www.doi.gov/cheeroke.html

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that this Resolution shall be the policy of the Joint
Council of the Cherokee Nation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians until it is withdrawn
or modified by subsequent resolution.
CERTIFICATION
The foregoing resolution was adopted by the Councils of the Cherokee Nation and the
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians at the Joint Council Meeting held in Catoosa, Oklahoma on
April 9, 2008, having __joint council members present, constituting a quorum, by the vote of
___yea; nay; abstaining.
Meredith A. Frailey
Speaker
Council ofthe Cherokee Nation
ATTEST
Mike Parker
Chairman of the Tribal Council
Eastern Band ofCherokee Indians
Approved and signed by the Principal Chiefs this 9th day ofApril, 2008.
Chadwick Smith
Principal Chief
Cherokee Nation
Michell Hicks
Principal Chief
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians








In all times, peace and struggle, there are defining moments. Moments
that define a change in direction, attitude, understanding, etc. Our
people have faced such times before and we will again. We faced the
devasting and illegal deal of the Treaty Party. We faced division in
the Civil War. We faced insult and devastation of the Dawes Commission,
now known as the Dawes Rolls.
At any time many of us are in such defining times even today.
Presidential Executive Orders, such as the one that defied the U.S.
Supreme Court and removed the Cherokee to Oklahoma, did not destroy our
Nation. The Congressional action of the Dawes commission that legally
disbanded the Cherokee Nation, did not destroy our Nation. The actions
by the Court systems past and present have and continue to hurt us.
However, they have not and will not destroy our Nation. Our Nation is
not contained in a particular area. It is not the monetary value of
property. It is not the balance in bank accounts.
The true value of our Nation is in the hearts and minds of our people,
you and I. Property can be given to evil. It can not destroy us. Wrong
intentions can be ordered to be in charge. It can not destroy us. Will
we choose to follow evil? Or will we step out with yet another step on
the path of White. If the Path leads up a steep grade and we slide back
some, well, we slid back on the Path of Peace but did we suddenly find
the Red Path under us? For that we would have to purposely leave the
White.
For those of us that have been sent back by Creator to work for the
People, we will not give up just because of some decree of a court or
other white government entity.
The Dark Warriors may wreak havoc, but they can not triumph, ultimately
that will always frustrate and undo their evil.
RT


                                                                             

Cherokee Nation, reorganized                                                               Western Cherokee Nation
May 8, 2007

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This site is under  development to reflect the multi-group/ multi-state and wide diversified interest of our Sisters and Brothers of Cherokee descent. It will reflect  how each group while widely different is amazingly similar. How we seek our Traditions of old and how we seek to apply them in our present Society and individual circumstances.
We welcome each of you. Join us as we seek to balance the past, to the future, in the most crucial direction of the Cardinal Seven: Here and Now, the only time and place that we have for action or inaction.
Rolling Thunder






Siyo Sisters and Brothers,
My thanks go out to Kathy Murphy, Wind Walker, White Bear,  Southern Big Bear, and Braven Heart as assistant managers. With out them our site would not be what it is.
We continue with our major purpose, Helping each other find our Cherokee Ancestors. At the same time we are moving ahead in other areas as well. But first let me point out some on site resources some of the newer members may have over looked and some of us older ones may have even forgotten about.
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/ideasleadingtosolutionsunifyingfactors.msnw
Ideas leading to solutions/Unifying Factors, was started when we realized among our selves that just venting our frustration was not enough for those of us concerned for the future. On this page please list your specific ideas for unifying Cherokee people and specific ideas for solutions to the perceived problems you see for us.
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/localcommunitygatherings.msnw
Local community gathering page is where you will find contact information for those willing to do their part to get local groups up and operating
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/allrollsconfirmedlinks.msnw
Rolls with confirmed links is for those of you that can trace a specific ancestor to one of the official rolls, i.e. Dawes, Baker, Drennen, etc., This way as we find connections to each other it makes it a bit simpler to tie back into that common ancestor that is on one of the official rolls.
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/wordsofwisdom.msnw
The words of wisdom page is not very full at this time. However it holds one of the most important messages, for me, that I have ever read.
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/cherokeehistorytimeline.msnw
Cherokee History Time Line is a project I hope to get back to in the near future. I wish to have a very full history line of major events of our people and branch off of the various times with our individual members family history stories. After all there really is no history of any people with a history of individual people first.
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/trustedpersonalpages.msnw
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/oralhistorypluslinks.msnw
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/links.msnw
These are all various pages that offer research links to different sites, both private and commercial.
http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/reseachgroupssourcelist.msnw
Research Groups Source List could be one of the most important tools we have. Please use thorough but concise information. This is not the place for detailed family history. However this is available 24/7 for any to come and look at. At this point let me please ask you to make sure your own links are active and that you have at the very least email contact information to an account that you do not let fill up and never check. It makes no sense to try to do genealogy and then not list a way to contact you. Please use an account that will remain even if you change internet providers. Management used to go through it and make all of your email links active but we have grown so that there just is not enough time to follow behind fixing things. Sorry.

http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/shoebox.msnw
If you use picture albums please understand that this is not an exhibit for art work, as nice as some of it is. The photos posted should offer genealogical value. Yes connecting to the living is of genealogical value. At the time of this writing I found no objectionable pictures in any of the albums. White Bear and Tazzy please feel free to post the informational pics and tag lines.
On to the other things I have mentioned.
Much thanks go out to Aginni for bringing to us Kituwah
ways of thinking and teaching. The spirituality Board, http://groups.msn.com/CherokeeHeritage/spirituality.msnw is for you to ask questions of Cherokee spirituality. I know we have covered it but just briefly again. Christianity while along with other religions and practices are indeed practice by Cherokee people, however, just because something is done by someone of Cherokee Blood does not make it Cherokee ways, i.e., religion, customs, etc. Which now leads me into the next topic.
Our latest efforts and energy is being applied to the effort to start local groups. It was the decision of the Charter group of leaders to make a concerted effort to learn the ways of the Kituwah as a base line teaching for us. Before anyone goes trying to read something into this effort that is not there, this is not an effort to build yet another unrecognized tribe. Those of us that have been involved for any length of time knows the political problems, fighting and just all around hate and discontent that is associated with that type of activity. We have two options for us to go to the sources and learn from. Those of us in the east will find the Stomp Grounds in North Carolina cared for by a Mr. Calhoun, I have not had the privilege of communicating with Mr. Calhoun, although some of us have and I trust their judgment. Those closer to the west will be looking to the Long Valley Stomp Grounds in Oklahoma for teaching.
I can not emphasis this enough. We are going to them to learn. We are not going to them to explain how we have always done things. We do not need to go anywhere to continue to do that. We go to them appreciative of the opportunity for learning. We will take what they offer and be thankful.
We have complained forever about not having teachers willing to take the time with us. Now, perhaps each group will have individuals that have the time and resources to go. Or maybe we as a group will have the resources to send a representative to begin learning, returning to the group and sharing. Each group will have to make that decision as it is able. Not all of us will be able to begin at the same time, but that is ok at least we will be making a new beginning. We will learn and we will respect the wishes of how to share this information that is imparted to us. If it is not for a public forum then, obviously we will not allow postings of that nature to remain on any of the sites.
We continue to look for those that wish to participate. The best tools we have for this is on our Yahoo mailing list, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Cherokee_Tradition_Society/polls . The Yahoo group is an open membership. However, it should be understood that hate and discontent will not be tolerated. Also just as with Cherokee Heritage on MSN this Yahoo Group is for Cherokee, not intertribal, not Christianity, Jewish, Muslim, etc. The Polls are in three parts. One is for how you would like to participate and the other two are for the physical location, state, you live in. We now have contacts for parts of or all of twelve states, and the list continues to grow. We have the potential to help foster at least two international groups as well where the ancestors descendents are scattered around the world. They may be in a different country but are just as Cherokee as you and I.
Our other web presence is hosted by TriPod, http://members.tripod.com/rollingthunder56/index.htm . This site is updated as often as I can get to it with information. It regularly has up to 400-500 hits or so a month. Not a huge amount but it serves as an informational site.
RT